Archive

Long-term storage of information. Pictures, sound and metadata stored in digital form can be archived and recovered without loss or distortion. The storage medium must be both reliable and stable and, as large quantities of information need to be stored, low cost is of major importance. Currently many are using magnetic tape. However there is also ongoing use of optical disks including DVD and Blu-Ray Disc formats and further developments are emerging.

Today, the increasingly IP and Ethernet-connected environments involving many video formats, including digital film, mean that data recorders make good sense. Archiving systems built around the current LTO-5 and LTO-6 data recorders are increasingly proving to be efficient and effective for media applications. The formats include backward compatibility to the previous LTO type. And with the tape cartridges offering 1.5 and 2.5 TB for LTO-5 and LTO-6 respectively, there is useful capacity.

Removable CD-size optical discs potentially offer quick access and denser storage as well as long-term reliability. The Archival Disc system, expected in 2015 from Sony and Panasonic, offers 300 GB with a roadmap to 1TB storage per disc.

For archiving stills and graphics there is far less need for of strong compression as the volume of data will typically be much smaller than that for video. CDs and DVDs are convenient and robust, giving near instant access to all stored pictures.

Traditionally, material is archived after its initial use – at the end of the process. More recently some archiving has moved to the beginning, or even before, the production process. An example is news where, in some cases, new material is archived as events happen. Later subsequent editing, etc., accesses this.

With the worldwide expansion of television channels everywhere, including online and mobile services, archives are increasingly used to help fulfill the huge demand for programming.

See also: AAF, Data recorders, LTO, Optical disks